Political Parallels and Horny Droids Star Wars: Poe Dameron 20

by Michael DeLaney

This article contains SPOILERS. If you haven’t read the issue yet, proceed at your own risk!

Apart from the obvious comparisons to the structure of A New Hope, one thing in particular that bothered me about The Force Awakens was The First Order. How did this massive evil military force mobilize so quickly with yet another Death Star? By drawing parallels to our current political nightmare, Poe Dameron 20 attempts to explain.

Amidst the doomed search for Lor San Tekka and some romantic drama, Charles Soule writes a background tale of The First Order’s rise to power. As resident seasoned veteran of The Rebellion, General Leia is the mouthpiece for the fear that The First Order’s evil will silently spread.

Leia warns that the Galaxy isn’t taking the threat of The First Order as seriously as they should, and that its indifference will ultimately be its downfall. Sound familiar to anyone? Soule recontextualizes the villains of The Force Awakens in light of America’s surprise at how easy it was for hate to move into The White House.

Poe Dameron is typically a guest star in his own book, which is more of a vehicle for Charles Soule to explore ideas in this third era of the Star Wars saga. The latest of those ideas? Droid romance.

Followed by a sequence explaining droids’ “obsessions,” Angel Unzieta draws a quirky scene that introduces us to BB-8’s new boyfriend/girlfriend/pleasure unit IVEE. I’m sure there will certain corners of fandom that will be outraged, but I say “God bless.” The fact that we don’t directly hear/see what a droid is saying leaves much of said romance up to the imagination, which is great.

Unzieta also revisits a fan-favorite moment from The Force Awakens: BB-8’s “thumbs up.” Again, I love the idea that droids have their own subculture and no one really knows what they’re up to. Personally, I’d be more interested in a droid uprising than The Galactic Empire Jr.

The conversation doesn’t stop there. What do you wanna talk about from this issue?

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One comment on “Political Parallels and Horny Droids Star Wars: Poe Dameron 20

  1. There is that really weird shot in the Force Awakens during the destruction of Hosnian Prime, where we see a woman stare up in the sky at the planet explode, and it is filmed in a way that suggests we are supposed to care about who the woman is. And apparently, that is because a cut scene involved the woman being sent by General Leia to the New Republic to petition for aid from a Republic that was trying to ignore the First Order.

    It is a shame stuff like that was cut. One of the most interesting ideas in the build up to the movie was the discussions on how the First Order weren’t the Empire, but the dregs of the previous Empire that had been allowed to rebuild by apathy until they became a new, massive threat. It was a shame that none of this was in the actual movie. THe idea that the war between the First Order and the Resistance was this tiny war being ignored by everyone until they blew up the seat of the New Republic could have been a really effective.

    I hope there is more time spent on exploring the First Order and their differences to the Empire, especially in the movies. I heard some fascinating comparisons in the build up to TFA, like comparing them to the Nazis that hid in Argentina after the war, and I think there is so much potential in that part of the First Order.

    Also, I’m not sure the BB-8 lighter trick is about subculture differences, and more about ambiguity of action. The fact that BB-8, by virtue of being an astromech droid, cannot easily replicate human cultural signs. The joke is that we don’t know what meaning BB-8 ascribes to it, but the reason we don’t know is that it could justifiably be both a thumbs up or a middle finger. And as he uses it in situations where he could justifiably doing both, nobody knows and the debate rages on

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