Sometimes a Comic is Actually Comedic in Ms. Marvel 28

By Taylor Anderson

This article contains SPOILERS. If you haven’t read the issue yet, proceed at your own risk!

Comics as a medium suffer from a case of poor branding. They’re called “comics” even though a majority of what we think of when we think of comics aren’t comedic at all. One has only to pick up an issue of Batman to get what I mean — the Dark Knight’s adventures aren’t exactly full of laughs (Joker antics aside). There are reasons for this nomenclature, of course, but it’s always kind of rewarding when comic treats its content with levity. This proves true in Ms. Marvel 28, but G. Willow Wilson accomplishes this without losing any of the series’ heart.

Kamala is still in hiding and her friends and Captain Marvel are left to deal with the Inventor in his bid to rid the world of old people in the name of progress. To help him in his cause, the Inventor has created a small army of giant reptile cyborgs. If that premise sounds a little silly, well, it is, and that’s a huge part of the charm in this issue. Wilson has written a plot full of comedic elements like this, serving to make the issue entertaining and, frankly, funny to read.

Artist Nico Leon is a perfect match for the story Wilson has written. His rendering of the Inventor’s army is straight aces.

All of these monsters are adorably cartoonish, suggesting that they aren’t actually a threat to New Jersey. In particular, I like the different expressions on each of their faces. You have the sassy alligator, the clueless frog, the serious iguana, and the ever hard-to-read snake. While it’s not impossible to fear these animals, their design is comedic, belying the danger of a madman trying to kill all the geriatrics in the world.

While Wilson and Leon include this comedic element, they don’t allow it to overtake the issue. Instead, while the issue isn’t overly serious, it does still have a lot of heart to it. Kamala’s rumination on running away from her problems, and her eventual decision to face them, is still relatable and makes her a character who is insanely easy to empathize with.

The conversation doesn’t stop there. What do you wanna talk about from this issue?

One comment on “Sometimes a Comic is Actually Comedic in Ms. Marvel 28

  1. I honestly love the reveal of where Kamala was. I felt it would be something like that, but it truly does work. And while I wish that we had at least one arc where the break up between Kamala and Carol actually influenced the story, I loved how they came together in a touching moment. Yeah, the issue is funny as hell (I love the giant monsters as well. The name of the private school is truly hilarious. And Carol standing in an action pose while Kamala’s friends line up behind her in hilarious ‘heroic’ poses is possibly even better than the Inventor’s army), but what really got me was Kamala’s struggles being the one that everyone needed.

    I love how Carol accidentally exasperated the situation by trying to let Kamala find her own path when she still needed the support, but also was so supportive and focused on helping Kamala (the discussion about getting Tony to create a Faraday lining on the suit is a wonderful example of theme expressed as procedural discussion). Maybe the only thing I would have liked was an extra page in the coda where Kamala actually talks to her friends about her issues, but I love how the story needles the thread between seeing the value in Kamala being the one everyone can turn to and the problem. And how her friends now have a greater appreciation of it and therefore Kamala can provide her value while getting the support she needs. It is actually quite subtle, emotional stuff to discuss, and Ms Marvel pulls it off with ease.

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